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Topic: Where could I find the original Irish folk songs used in Voyager?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
Jammer Offline




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Posted: Nov. 25 2000, 19:05

I'm sure I'm not just the only one who is more than curious of hearing what the original versions of the pieces which MO aranged on Voyager are like

It's quite a good album and another one which I got very recently (since posting this message). Definately not one for the first time fan, no-way. They'd be scared by his wierd dress sense anyway.

The two tracks 'She Moves Through the Fair' and 'Wild Goose Flaps its Wings' are quite misnomic titles. Before I heard them I was expecting lively pieces. They are both slow. I especially like SMTTF reminding me more of celtic scenery than someone going through a fair unaware of the surroundings. Although according to the liner notes Mike didn't write 'The Song of the Sun' it is the most easiest to listen to in the album, but like the others he must have arranged and covered it. If so, why doesn't it say "(Bieito Romero arranged by Mike Oldfield)" like the other arranged tracks? Did this Bieito Romero person write all the synthesised drum backing bit? (I know there is also a real bodhran played on top of this). The last track on the album 'Mont St. Michel' is a very good instrumental. Now Mike has the facilities and the money to afford a proper symphony orchestra to play the parts, which 'The Lake' would have benefited from so much unlike using the Fairlight CMI(?) sounds. MSM could have easily been included in the Braveheart soundtrack. Compared to the other instrumentals it is the most mature one (although there was another person doing the string arrangements). I thought it was going to be like 'Lake Constance' where I think Mike is trying too hard to get good Adagio sounding chords without properly knowing the right timbres you can get out of a string orchestra. I bet when this album came out there were fans much like there are now who long for a good atmospheric piece like Ommadawn and HR and they were answered for. My favourite bits are when it gets faster into a sort of jig rhythm with the horns and the final climax at the end. If you had this same tune played on some overdubbed 12 string guitars with a bodhran and an african choir singing loudly, it could easily pass as an Amarok climax. But the rising scale passage on the strings sounds a bit too cheesy and spoils it a bit. Also, what the hell is that snare drum roll for? Just to prolong it a bit, but there could have been some sort of post climax like in Crises
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Archangel Foster Offline




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Posted: Nov. 25 2000, 19:55

Women of Ireland is on Chieftains 4, here with its Gaelic name 'Mná na h Éireann', and it's not a traditional piece as stated on Voyager, but written by the great Irish composer Séan O'Riada.
I (mostly) agree about Mont St. Michel, it's about the best Mike has put out recently, but still there's too much Kitsch in it, and I really don't quite get what the end is about.
I don't know about the other pieces, I'll check my collection of Irish music but I don't think they're there anywhere.
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Thea Cochrane Offline




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Posted: Nov. 27 2000, 07:36

Hey, they're not all Irish!

Dark Island is a Scots song (the only recording which I have heard of it are by a French folk band called Micamac, but there must be others out there). The original actually sounds pretty far removed from Mike's version, I'll do a MIDI of it sometime if you can't find it.

Flowers in the Forest is a combination of two tunes - I can't remember what the second one is called - but, again, they're Scots.

There is a bit in the middle of Women Of Ireland which is a pretty major reference to Bach's Sarabande as well. Micamac did versions of both these tunes too, I wonder if Mike has heard of them?
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Man In Rain Offline




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Posted: Nov. 27 2000, 10:31

'She Moves through the Fair' can be found on the album Gospel Oak by Sinead O'Connor with lyrics which I consider to be a translation in English of the original lyrics. And I have recently heard a song: 'The Christians - Words' which was quite similar to 'Women of Ireland'.
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GMOVJ Offline




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Posted: Nov. 28 2000, 08:26

* Women of Ireland : yes, the Christians did covered this title with their 'Words'. It was clearly announced.
There's also the covered version by Alan Stivell, called 'Mná na h Éireann' too.
A good orchestral version of Women of Ireland can be found (if I remember correctly) on 'Barry Lindon' soundtrack.

* Bieito Romero is a (very active) member of Luar Na Lubre ( www.luarnalubre.com/band/band.htm ). It can be considered as 'spanish' Gaelic music (Galician is more exact, isn't it Cipher ?) and not Irish. I don't know if LNL did their own version of 'The Song of The Sun', but reading their discogrphy i guess it may be 'O BERCE DO SOL' on 'On son do ar'. Confirmation anyone ?
Cheers, GMOVJ

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GMOVJ
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bennyboy Offline




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Posted: Nov. 28 2000, 16:12

Incidentally, Sarah Brightman also did a vocal version of "Women Of Ireland" called "So Many Things" on the CD "Eden".
(see my post on Brightman in the "Other Artists" section)

"She Moves Through The Fair" can also be found on Charlotte Church's self titled album.

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GMOVJ Offline




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Posted: Nov. 30 2000, 03:40

'She Moves Through The Fair' : I found a version by Alan Campbell on a compilation called 'The Best of Irish Folk' (2CD)...

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GMOVJ
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Cipher Offline




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Posted: Nov. 30 2000, 07:40

Yes GMOVJ, Galizia (in galego, Galicia in spanish) is the Gaelic part of Spain, it's an authonomic comunity as Catalonia o Basc Country are, with their own language. You can find gaelic ethnia from Galizia to Galatia, in Turkey. Did you ever imagined druids around nearest east many years ago? But they were there also! smile
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Cipher Offline




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Posted: Nov. 30 2000, 07:43

Another WOI in Lorena McKenitt The Visit.
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Cipher Offline




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Posted: Nov. 30 2000, 07:46

Sorry it's not WOI is She moves thr the fair
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GMOVJ Offline




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Posted: Dec. 05 2000, 03:57

Oops too...
SMTTF : Sorry, this is not Alan Campbell but ALEX CAMPBELL...

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GMOVJ
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Posted: Feb. 14 2001, 11:53

Women of Ireland is featured on the motion picture "Barry Lyndon", which has as a main theme Haendel's Sarabande. So, Mike was probably influenced by the movie and the use of the music in it when he did his version of the song.
In Barry Lyndon's soundtrack there are 2 versions, one with the Chieftains and one with Derek Bell on harp.
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GMOVJ Offline




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Posted: Mar. 19 2001, 08:43

Hi all
i just remember a thing... The Chieftains, on the album "The Long Black Veil", there's a version of SMTTF, but called "He moves trough the fair"
BTW, this album is simply great, all songs are played with guest like Sting, Ry Cooder, Mark Knopfler, S. O'Connor - excellent on 'The foggy dew'...

I've got under my hand a 'new' compilation of celtic music made by Virgin France where you can hear a version of SMTTF by Meav.

[And "Born to Dance" by Jon Anderson. This would fit better in Related Artist forum, all right. But it is G-R-E-A-T !]

And an important thing : a long melodic riff taken (stricto sensus) from Polka at the begining of "Hills of Connemara" by Gaelic Storm.

Cheers, GMOVJ
PS : sorry to French speaking Tubular-ML members for this redundant post wink

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GMOVJ
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