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Topic: Superb music. Terrible production.< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 23 2017, 20:34

What I mean is that an artist's work is linked to the time and place in which they were born. The experiences they have growing up shapes their work. This can be anything from fashion trends, to international diplomacy, social norms, television shows, toys, prominent people and so on and so forth. All these become less relevant as time passes and all the little influencing bits are spent, having been a part of a whole generation's artistic works. In a way, they become cliche or even overused.

It's a huge topic though. What I've written doesn't do it justice.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 24 2017, 08:45

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 24 2017, 19:17

That's a completely different thing. Uncle Tom's Cabin is a work that does transcend time and space but if you were to write a similar novel today it would be out of place and non-relevant. If we pretend that Iliad never existed and one was to write the Iliad today, it would seem utterly ridiculous and no one would bother.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 25 2017, 04:05

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 25 2017, 05:02

Punk
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 25 2017, 09:24

:)
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Yann Offline




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Posted: Feb. 25 2017, 10:07

Quote (hellegennes @ Feb. 24 2017, 19:17)
That's a completely different thing. Uncle Tom's Cabin is a work that does transcend time and space but if you were to write a similar novel today it would be out of place and non-relevant. If we pretend that Iliad never existed and one was to write the Iliad today, it would seem utterly ridiculous and no one would bother.

Do you mean, as a writer that didn't live in Ancient Rome had written "I, Claudius", or a writer that didn't live during Middle Age had written "The Pillars of Earth"?

Not to say the events in Tom's Uncle Cabin are supposed to happen about two centuries ago. So you're saying that a writer today writing about something supposed to happen two centuries before, that would be utterly ridiculous, while the Iliad, which was written about four centuries after the Trojan War, is someway OK, isn't it?
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 25 2017, 17:45

No. Uncle Tom's Cabin is a story that was very relevant when it was first published. The time in which the story takes place is completely irrelevant. Same for the Iliad. Homer describes a glorious past in a post-glorious Greece. It's known as the Greek Dark Ages, a major collapse of Bronze Age Greek civilization. Also, mind that Homer writes about Bronze Age Greece and Greeks as if they lived in the Dark Ages, akin to the way Geoffrey of Monmouth recounted Arthur's story as if it happened in the Middle Ages.

That is, I am not saying that writing historic fiction is ridiculous. This is not the issue I am describing.

It's not even the story itself that matters that much; it's the structure, the style, the language. If you try to mimic Shakespeare's style and language, it will come off as stilted, pompous, verbose and self-important. The other thing that matters are the underlying issues you highlight in your story. If it is just for fun, you may as well create any story. But writing about slavery, or women's right to vote in Europe is not relevant today and if you're writing serious fiction about it, it will seem ridiculous.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 26 2017, 05:23

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 26 2017, 06:15

Whatever you create may be long lived; what matters is to create it using means that are current when you do. Shakespeare's works have survived the test of time but writing in this form is not current today.

Now, if I were a musician, I wouldn't care about the longevity of my work. I would have just wanted to create first and foremost what I like myself.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 26 2017, 06:42

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 26 2017, 16:50

That people tend to become less creative as they grow old, not only because their creativity is spent but also because their ideas and style becomes less fresh and relevant. Very few people can overcome the obstacle of their work being directly influenced by the social environment in which they grew up.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 06:05

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 10:10

You don't need pain necessarily to create a masterpiece. Tchaikovsky's 4th Symphony is pain-free and it's one of his greatest works, not to mention his Orchestral Suite 4. Plus, he wrote his best pieces of music when he was -for his time- quite wealthy, well-known and middle-aged.

A lot of romantic, classical and baroque music is pain-free.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 10:59

:)
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 11:01

:)
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hellegennes Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 16:12

Thanks. :)

I actually write poetry myself so I am quite aware of what you are saying. It's just that it's not always a monochrome picture. Sometimes great pain can create great art, even if that is not reflected in the work itself (it usually is, though). But it's not a necessary prerequisite for great art.

Also, I think that Mike has been through a lot of pain in the past couple of years. He is just not lost, which is what he was when he wrote his three orchestral album after TB. He is settled now, he knows what he wants, he made peace with aspects of his life and past that made him angry or confused.
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Erick Offline




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Posted: Feb. 27 2017, 16:55

:)
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shenry Offline




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Posted: Feb. 28 2019, 11:29

Just want to chip in here with a comparison between the CD and vinyl. I bought the CD first and then got the vinyl as a christmas present.

I think it's like night and day. The acoustic guitar sounds are too clinical on the CD, but on vinyl they really pop out with that elusive quality - "warmth".

Whatever your opinion on CD vs vinyl in general, I think this LP is really made for the organic, crackly sound of vinyl.
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58 replies since Jan. 21 2017, 06:01 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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